Tag Archives: on Saving Money

Environmental Consciousness and Bargain Shopping: Intertwined

A marriage of eco and commerce?? or just a more ethical way of doing business?

We’ve all heard of Groupon, LivingSocial, Dealicious, Dealfind, Webpiggy, and a host of other deal of the day sites promising terrific savings on restaurants, botox injections and hair removal, but have you heard of ethicalDeal? (affiliate link)

  • Do you think that going green is too expensive?
  • Don’t know where to find green products/services?
  • Not sure what green products/services to trust?

Those of you who are fond of the environment and looking for a good deal are going to love this.

Annalea Krebs has created an innovative Canadian company based out of Vancouver that uses the group buying model to introduce people to “green” alternatives in Toronto and Vancouver (with great aspirations to conquer North America and beyond)—making it easy for people to discover and save on everything “green” their city.

Prior to founding ethicalDeal, Annalea managed sales, marketing and community relations for various social enterprises and green businesses including: TheChange.com, Values-Based Business Network, Organic Islands Festival & Sustainability Expo and the Canadian Social Entrepreneurship Foundation.

EthicalDeal makes it easy to go green by finding local companies that offer eco-friendly products/services, ensure they meet some pretty tough standards, and then use the collective buying power of thousands of members to get you exclusive discounts on the best green stuff your city has to offer.

Part green city guide, part green deal site, part green action network … ethicalDeal helps you discover the best green stuff to do, see and buy in your city, at exclusive discounts, through the power of group buying!

The beautiful thing is, that you personally can help advance the environmental and sustainability movement across North America and while you are at it, get an awesome deal!

Tax Free Savings Accounts

The government of Canada gave us Canadians another tax savings option in the 2008 federal budget that will go far in helping Canadians accumulate wealth in a tax-effective manner.  The Tax Free Savings Account is quite simple, and the features of the plan are as follows:

  • It is open to all Canadians over the age of 18, and continues for life.
  • The maximum contribution into this plan will be $5,000 per year. That amount will be increase with inflation in increments of $500 in future years.
  • There is NO tax deduction available for deposits.
  • All income and growth is exempt from taxation, even on withdrawal.
  • Unused contribution room can be carried forward.  If you make a withdrawal, the amount withdrawn can be replenished to the account in subsequent years without any penalty.
  • As with an RRSP, the plan contemplates spousal contributions without affecting the contribution room of the spouse receiving the spousal contribution.
  • TFSA can then be used for whatever purpose at whatever time. (buying a house, paying for a wedding, starting a business, etc.).

We think that every Canadian over the age of 18 should have this account. For the time being, your TFSA balance will be small, and that will limit your investment options, but it is a great place to hold any extra cash – since the account has no penalties to your “room” when you withdraw, you can move funds in and out without penalty.  And, with interest rates at record low levels, we need all the help we can get on interest savings after tax and inflation are taken into account.

Here are two strategies that you can implement in the future:

  • Lower income taxpayers: for taxpayers who are saving their money while earning a lower income, the TFSA is a better deal than the RRSP (i.e. for the spouse during maternity leave). This is because the positive effect of the RRSP deduction is less if the taxpayer has a lower income tax rate (lower tax rate = lower amount of tax back from your RRSP deduction). If an individual is in a situation where they expect to be earning more in the future, then the TFSA would be a far better choice, and the taxpayer could carry forward RRSP room for future deductions, hopefully at higher tax rates.
  • Funding Education for Adult Children: parents might consider funding more of a child’s education on the agreement that the adult child save the equivalent amount in their TFSA. This would allow the parents to take all relevant deductions and credits for funding their children’s education, and it would allow the children to begin to accumulate savings in their own TFSA. They are likely earning a very low income as a student, their contribution to the TFSA will come at a very low after‐tax cost.
  • All in all, I think that the TFSA is a good move for Canadians. If for no other reason, it simply provides you with another planning tool. If the tax benefits are not enough to persuade you, then the added planning options and flexibility should.